VIDEO: McCain Institute Hosts Discussion on NATO and China Post-Russian Invasion

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The McCain Institute at Arizona State University hosted the third conversation of a four-part event series focused on the importance of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and building awareness of mis, dis, and mal-information (MDM) campaigns that seek to undermine public trust in institutions like NATO.

Yesterday’s discussion featured Member of the Lithuanian Parliament and former Ambassador to the United States Žygimantas Pavilionis, Nonresident Senior Fellow with the Democratic Resilience Program at the Center for European Policy Analysis (CEPA) Bobo Lo and Director of European Values Center for Security Policy (Czech Republic) Jakub Janda. The conversation was moderated by McCain Institute Human Rights & Democracy Program Director Paul Fagan.

The discourse centered around the future of NATO’s approach to China in the aftermath of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The panelists also touched on how Russia’s invasion has impacted China’s relationship with Russia and with their own neighbors.

“We have to stand for democracies from Ukraine to Taiwan; we have to stand for each other and defend each other, because if the Russians win the war in Ukraine, China will learn that lesson,” said Member of the Lithuanian Parliament and former Ambassador to the United States Žygimantas Pavilionis. “Today we have to be back on blocks defending democracy, extending NATO to Sweden and Finland and even Ukraine. Together, we have to make that red line really clear, and we really have to rethink some of our international institutions.”

“For Beijing, the war in Ukraine has unfolded in the worst possible way. Ukrainian resistance has been highly effective, the Russian military has performed disastrously and the western reaction has been far stronger than anyone – certainly in Beijing – had expected. Putin has been humiliated on a personal as well as a political level,” said Nonresident Senior Fellow with the Democratic Resilience Program at the Center for European Policy Analysis (CEPA) Bobo Lo. “China is now struggling to balance their Russian partnership and their relations with the West. There are no good options for China, and they can’t sustain this for much longer.”

“China pays attention to Western sanctions. We need China to see that this is how the world reacts to such an attack on democracy,” said Director of European Values Center for Security Policy (Czech Republic) Jakub Janda. “We need to make sure that the Chinese leadership understands that Western capitals have a list of Chinese interests in their own countries that are ready to be damaged if China invades Taiwan.”

This event was funded in part by a grant from the United States Department of State – NATO Mission. The opinions, findings and conclusions stated herein are those of the author[s] and do not necessarily reflect those of the United States Department of State.

Click HERE to watch the full event.

About the McCain Institute at Arizona State University
Inspired by Senator John S. McCain and his family’s legacy of public service, the McCain Institute for International Leadership is fighting to secure democracy and alliances, defend human rights, protect the vulnerable and advance character-driven leadership, both at home and around the world.

About Arizona State University
Arizona State University has developed a new model for the American research university, creating an institution that is committed to access, excellence and impact. ASU measures itself by those it includes, not by those it excludes. As the prototype for a New American University, ASU pursues research that contributes to the public good, and ASU assumes major responsibility for the economic, social and cultural vitality of the communities that surround it.

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Publish Date
March 30, 2022
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